Lifestyle Factors

Posted by Richard Yogle | Posted in | Posted on 9:10 PM

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Your lifestyle also affects your lung function, because it helps determine what your lungs are exposed to every day. If you live in a big city and walk to work, chances are you’re exposed to a great deal of car exhaust and other pollution.

If you work on a farm, you may breathe in quite a bit of grain dust and other particles. Two of the most important lifestyle factors, though, are smoking and exercise, or lack of it. The choices you make in these two areas can have a profound impact on how well your lungs work, regardless of whether you already have COPD or you’re trying to avoid it.

Environmental factors

Posted by Richard Yogle | Posted in | Posted on 9:09 PM

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Environmental factors

Your lungs interact with the environment with every breath. When you breathe in air, you also take in whatever is in the air — dust, soot, pollen and spores, noxious gases, and so on. Usually, your body’s natural defenses can keep these foreign invaders at bay. But sometimes they overwhelm your defenses, and, when they do, they can cause real damage.

Factors That Influence Your Lung Function

Posted by Richard Yogle | Posted in | Posted on 9:08 PM

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Factors That Influence Your Lung Function

A number of things affect how well your lungs work. One is genetics: A family history of lung problems may mean you’re more susceptible to problems yourself. Depending on their severity, childhood diseases, allergies, and asthma can have an impact on how well your lungs carry on their job, too. And then there are the factors that influence everyone to one degree or another. These include both the inevitable — getting older — and some things you can control, like exposure to certain irritants or smoking.

COPD Life Expectancy

Posted by Richard Yogle | Posted in | Posted on 9:06 PM

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Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States and the second leading cause of disability. The costs associated with COPD are enormous — more than $37 billion a year, including $20 billion a year just in direct healthcare costs. Some 12 million American adults have been diagnosed with COPD, and another 12 million may have it but don’t know it.

Causes of COPD

Posted by Richard Yogle | Posted in | Posted on 9:05 PM

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Causes of COPD Factors from your childhood, your lifestyle as an adult, even what happened to you in the womb can influence your COPD risk. If you experienced severe respiratory infections as a child, your lungs may have suffered permanent damage, which can make the onset of COPD more likely.

If your parents smoked in the house when you were a child, your lungs may have suffered from the effects of secondhand smoke. And if your mother smoked when she was pregnant with you, that may have affected the development of your lungs, which, in turn, could raise your risk for COPD. - See more at: http://www.allaboutcopd.com/causes-of-copd/

The different COPD stages

Posted by Richard Yogle | Posted in | Posted on 6:39 PM

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COPD Stages


Mild COPD
COPD Stages
Many people with mild COPD (sometimes called Stage I by doctors) don’t get diagnosed because their symptoms are so subtle that they don’t mention them to their doctors. You may feel a little out of breath if you do some hard physical labor, like raking the yard or lifting and carrying things, or when you walk fast. You may even notice that you can’t do as much as you used to before you feel short of breath.

And you may not think much of it, figuring that’s only to be expected as you get older or put on a few extra pounds. You also may cough more frequently than you used to. Sometimes you may cough up mucus, but probably not too often. Maybe you don’t know why you cough, or maybe you figure it’s just smoker’s cough, especially if you do it most in the morning shortly after you wake up.

COPD Prevention and Treatment

Posted by Richard Yogle | Posted in | Posted on 6:03 PM

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COPD Prevention and Treatment 


The most common complications for COPD patients are exacerbations, which are often caused by respiratory infections. Just having COPD makes you more susceptible to whatever contagious illnesses may be making the rounds, and you’re especially vulnerable to colds, the flu, and pneumonia. Your doctor probably will recommend you get a flu shot every year and a pneumonia vaccine every five years. If you’re allergic to eggs, you may not be able to have a flu shot. Make sure your doctor knows about any allergies you have, and ask what options there are if getting a flu shot isn’t recommended.

Read more about COPD treatment here at AllAboutCOPD.com - some of the best information we've found anywhere.